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New Monasticism Study Day and Official Book Launch

On 15th February anyone interested in New Monastic mission model of ecclesial community or Church has a real treat – a study day followed by the official launch of the seminal resource, “A New Monastic Handbook“, co-authored by Mark Berry and our own Ian Mobsby, Ordained Anglican Missioner and a founding member of the Moot Community.

Whether you are exploring models of missional communities, wondering about forms of Christian spirituality and community, passionate about contemplative approaches to prayer and action or a diocesan missioner, this is for you.

The study day is free for participants of the Moot Community with discounted places available for Moot supporters and companions.  See the event page for more information or book now.

Attendees of the study day will be welcome to stay for the launch, or people are also welcome to just come to either part of the day.

See you there!

 

Moot in company magazine!

The winter issue of Company magazine – out today – as if you didn’t already know – has run a feature about people (particularly fashion-conscious girls in their twenties, as per Company style) increasingly seeking out spirituality as Christmas comes around, and in fact generally the rise in this sort of bag.

And Moot gets the mention of ‘places this is happening’, alongside Hillsong church, who meet in the ‘We Will Rock You!’ theatre, a fact I love about them.

In fact we get called ‘one of the coolest around’! Page 81.

(And then I get quoted, at length and not without some manipulative editing that the journalist assures me was not her doing. But the jist is there, i.e. “Hello Company, I ♥ moot”).

So, if you weren’t already planning to buy a copy and slate any of your friends featured in it for their turn of phrase / shade of camel, it’s on the shelves now….

Save the sky

Depressing as autumn and winter’s darkness can become, electricity seems to have been mistakenly exalted as the saviour of our winter mood. The UK, where Moot is based, is on a bit of the globe where we get a clockload of daylight hours in summer and barely any in winter.

But, Christmas lights aside – a whole bag of flashing tricks I don’t want to even begin to unwrap – autumn and the January blues bring a miserable proliferation of ‘let’s leave the lights on all night’ tactics from the City district where Moot meets. Cheering, it surely ain’t.

When I was about 11, Blue Peter ran a competition for children to design creative lighting for local monuments and suchlike, and the winners had their lighting projects made reality. I’m 25 now, and  I’m optimistic that an idea like this these days would get shot down at the concept stage because ‘light pollution’ is now a recognisable phrase. Hopefully this shows how far we’ve come.

But on the flipside of ‘how far we’ve come’ flashbacks, J.M. Barrie had Peter Pan tell the Darling children in 1904 that they had to take the ‘second star to the right and straight on til morning’ to leave London for Neverland – and they only lived in Zone 1 as we now know it. Imagine J.K. Rowling trying an equivalent for London kids these days. TheStars are extinct in central, and greater, and even peripheral London now.

Waking home past civil service offices of Westminster, and, when I come through the City district, a lot of very clean glass or stone-pillared banking buildings, the lights are left on to show empty desks and grey ceiling tiles.  I think the logic is an aesthetic one. And with 16 hours’ darkness a day at the height of our winter, it’s not hard to see how we got here.

But the waste of electricity is scandalous – and it is waste, because it isn’t useful and nor in most cases is it even beautiful. When did it strike someone as interesting to see other people’s messy (or, even more annoying, tidy) desks lit up all night? More London is terrible for it – Boris Johnson, bringing us bikes but not switching off lights, evidently.

As a good little book called ‘change the world for a fiver’ puts it: ‘ivory was considered beautiful once’. But then, fur is back in. I might be less universally agreed-with than I’d like to imagine. After all, the banks and businesses I’m walking past don’t agree. Every evening someone in that building doesn’t agree.

http://www.dark-skies.org.uk is the British Astronomical Association’s website for their campaign for dark, starry, natural skies. They say the UK alone is wasting £1 billion a year through pointless or inefficient lighting, and that (and this is really sad) less than 10% of us can see natural skies at night. http://www.saveenergy.co.uk is the energy saving trust’s very practical website with some do-able stuff for everyone, and some well-thought-through possibilities for businesses and the public sector.

A Trinitarian Vision of Consciousness, by Robert A. Jonas

A Trinitarian Vision of Consciousness, by Robert A. Jonas from www.emptybell.org

A Review of Lyotard’s “The Postmodern Condition” by Aaron Kennedy

A Review of Lyotard’s “The Postmodern Condition” by Aaron Kennedy

Theological references in Douglas Coupland’s “Life After God” by Ian Mobsby

Theological references in Douglas Coupland’s “Life After God” by Ian Mobsby

A Theology for The Emerging Church by Ian Mobsby

A Theology for The Emerging Church by Ian Mobsby

What is Alternative Worship? An address at Southwark Cathedral by Ian Mobsby

What is Alternative Worship? An address at Southwark Cathedral by Ian Mobsby

True Protestants Allow Diversity, by Keith Ward

True Protestants Allow Diversity, by Keith Ward

Review: Douglas Coupland, ‘Life After God’, by Ian Mobsby

Review: Douglas Coupland, ‘Life After God’, by Ian Mobsby